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019 RUTLAND STREET, HOUSE COLLAPSE

Three men, Mr. Fergus Ingle, of 107 Shanabooley Road, Ballynanty; Mr. Frank Sexton of 30 Pennywell, and Mr. Jim Kennedy of Clare Street miraculously escaped serious injury when the building they were demolishing in Rutland Street, fell onto the street. After that near miss the Corporation decided to demolish the building by crane rather than by hand.
All three agreed that all that was holding up the building was the scaffolding which was supplied and erected by local firm Sean Curtin & Sons Scaffolding, Gerald Griffin Street

RUTLAND STREET, A BRIEF HISTORY

Limerick Chronicle, Saturday, February 23, 1946

Old Rutland Street Ð a centre of prosperity

AN INTERESTING paper on ÒOld Rutland StreetÓ was read by Mr. E. H. Bennis at a meeting of the Old Limerick Society. The following is a full publication of the paper:

The history of the older streets of Limerick, and the reminiscences of their residents, is a fascinating subject for anyone who takes the trouble to investigate them. I have selected one of the shortest Ð that crooked bottleneck thoroughfare, known as Rutland Street, at one time one of the most important and prosperous of Limerick streets. When ArthurÕs Quay, Francis Street, Patrick Street and, later, Newtown Pery, were being developed, most of the traffic between these newly laid-out districts and the populous Englishtown passed through Rutland Street, the more so as country traffic came over Thomond Bridge; Wellesley Bridge, now known as Sarsfield Bridge, not having then been built. Added to this was the fact that it was the connecting link between the money spending elite of ArthurÕs Quay and Francis Street, and the wealthy private bankers and domineering Verekers of Bank Place.
I think it derived its name from the Duke of Rutland, who, when he was Lord Lieutenant, visited Limerick in State in 1785. Rutland Street had the advantage of having two of the finest buildings in Limerick, one at each end Ð the one near the Abbey River used for the General Post
019 RUTLAND STREET, HOUSE COLLAPSE

019 RUTLAND STREET, HOUSE COLLAPSE

Three men, Mr. Fergus Ingle, of 107 Shanabooley Road, Ballynanty; Mr. Frank Sexton of 30 Pennywell, and Mr. Jim Kennedy of Clare Street miraculously escaped serious injury when the building they were demolishing in Rutland Street, fell onto the street. After that near miss the Corporation decided to demolish the building by crane rather than by hand.
All three agreed that all that was holding up the building was the scaffolding which was supplied and erected by local firm Sean Curtin & Sons Scaffolding, Gerald Griffin Street

RUTLAND STREET, A BRIEF HISTORY

Limerick Chronicle, Saturday, February 23, 1946

Old Rutland Street Ð a centre of prosperity

AN INTERESTING paper on ÒOld Rutland StreetÓ was read by Mr. E. H. Bennis at a meeting of the Old Limerick Society. The following is a full publication of the paper:

The history of the older streets of Limerick, and the reminiscences of their residents, is a fascinating subject for anyone who takes the trouble to investigate them. I have selected one of the shortest Ð that crooked bottleneck thoroughfare, known as Rutland Street, at one time one of the most important and prosperous of Limerick streets. When ArthurÕs Quay, Francis Street, Patrick Street and, later, Newtown Pery, were being developed, most of the traffic between these newly laid-out districts and the populous Englishtown passed through Rutland Street, the more so as country traffic came over Thomond Bridge; Wellesley Bridge, now known as Sarsfield Bridge, not having then been built. Added to this was the fact that it was the connecting link between the money spending elite of ArthurÕs Quay and Francis Street, and the wealthy private bankers and domineering Verekers of Bank Place.
I think it derived its name from the Duke of Rutland, who, when he was Lord Lieutenant, visited Limerick in State in 1785. Rutland Street had the advantage of having two of the finest buildings in Limerick, one at each end Ð the one near the Abbey River used for the General Post