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016 Fitzgibbon Monument Sarsfield Bridge

John Charles Henry, Viscount Fitzgibbon, son of Richard Fitzgibbon, Third Earl of Clare and grandson of Black Jack,the First Earl of Clare, was reportedly killed in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava on October 25, 1854 though when the battle was over his body was never found and the rumours were that many years later he was seen in Hounsloy Barracks where his regiment, the 8th Hussars were stationed. He was also reported to be seen in India, again in the messroom of the 8th Hussars. A monument was erected in his honour on Wellesley (now Sarsfield) Bridge. Kevin Hannan wrote in his book Limerick, Historical Reflections that “on June 9, 1930, the monument was blown to pieces by a few local heroes.” The following inscription was engraved at the front of the pedestal:
“To commemorate the bravery of Viscount Fitzgibbon, 8th Royal Irish Hussars; and his gallant companions in arms, natives of the County of Limerick, who gloriously fell in the Crimean War, 1855.”
The two cannon were reputedly captured during the Crimean War, are of Russian origin and were given to the monument committee by the government of the time.

Picture: O’Shea family Collection
016 Fitzgibbon Monument Sarsfield Bridge

016 Fitzgibbon Monument Sarsfield Bridge

John Charles Henry, Viscount Fitzgibbon, son of Richard Fitzgibbon, Third Earl of Clare and grandson of Black Jack,the First Earl of Clare, was reportedly killed in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava on October 25, 1854 though when the battle was over his body was never found and the rumours were that many years later he was seen in Hounsloy Barracks where his regiment, the 8th Hussars were stationed. He was also reported to be seen in India, again in the messroom of the 8th Hussars. A monument was erected in his honour on Wellesley (now Sarsfield) Bridge. Kevin Hannan wrote in his book Limerick, Historical Reflections that “on June 9, 1930, the monument was blown to pieces by a few local heroes.” The following inscription was engraved at the front of the pedestal:
“To commemorate the bravery of Viscount Fitzgibbon, 8th Royal Irish Hussars; and his gallant companions in arms, natives of the County of Limerick, who gloriously fell in the Crimean War, 1855.”
The two cannon were reputedly captured during the Crimean War, are of Russian origin and were given to the monument committee by the government of the time.

Picture: O’Shea family Collection